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Wednesday, July 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Phaedra and Hippolytus found in the catalog.

Phaedra and Hippolytus

James L. Sanderson

Phaedra and Hippolytus

myth and dramatic form. Edited by James L. Sanderson [and] Irwin Gopnik.

by James L. Sanderson

  • 159 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Houghton Mifflin in Boston .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Drama -- Collections,
  • Phaedra (Greek mythology),
  • Hippolytus (Greek mythology)

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsGopnik, Irwin
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 388 p. ;
    Number of Pages388
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19286844M

    Phaedra unleashes a tragic series of events when she is mistakenly told that Theseus has died and she reveals her taboo love for her stepson. Her husband returns and both Phaedra and Hippolytus pay the ultimate price for their forbidden desires. Phaedra married King Theseus of Athens and gave him two sons; but she also fell in love with her stepson Hippolytus 4. Since he refused her, and her passion for him became known, she hanged herself, leaving a letter in which she charged her stepson of having assaulted her. This happened in Troezen, say some, or in Athens, say others.

      File:Hippolytus Sir Lawrence Alma From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. According to some sources, Hippolytus had spurned Aphrodite to remain a steadfast and virginal devotee of Artemisand Aphrodite made Phaedra fall in love with him as a punishment.   This is an English translation of Euripides' tragedy Hippolytus about how Phaedra unsuccessfully fights her desire for Hippolytus, while he risks his life to keep her passion secret. Focus Classical Library provides close translations with notes and essays. No play of Euripides is more admired than Hippolytus. The tale of a married woman stirred to passion for a younger man was traditional.

    Seneca's Phaedra. Dating from perhaps earlier on in the chronology of Seneca's tragedies, the Phaedra combines two story-telling motifs: That of the evil stepmother. (Hippolytus will die as a result of his stepmother's falsely accusing him of attempted rape), and. The Hippolytus quotes below are all either spoken by Phaidra or refer to Phaidra. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to.


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Phaedra and Hippolytus by James L. Sanderson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Hippolytus tells the story of Theseus' wife Phaedra, who is put under a love-spell by the vengeful Aphrodite after the latter is spurned by Phaedra's stepson Hyppolytus. Sick with love for her stepson, Phaedra /5. The story of the Hippolytus–Phaedra relationship is derived from one of several ancient Greek myths revolving around archetypal Athenian hero, Theseus.

The Greek playwright Euripides wrote two versions of the tragedy, the lost Hippolytus Veiled and the extant Hippolytus ( B.C.E.). out of 5 stars The Phaedra-Hippolytus-Theseus story, Latinized. Reviewed in the United States on J Oh hell, it looks like Amazon has decided that every book on the Phaedra is the same book.

Here, I'll offer my impression on Mayer's Commentary on the Phaedra Reviews: 7. Hippolytus tells the story of Theseus' wife Phaedra, who is put under a love-spell by the vengeful Aphrodite after the latter is spurned by Phaedra's stepson /5(). If Hippolytus were only a shadowy figure, Phaedra's love would be incomprehensible, and the tragic dimensions of a great passion would be reduced to mere wantonness.

Hence Racine made of Hippolytus a distinctive and memorable character. He is not. ☯ Full Synopsis: ""Hippolytus is generally acknowledged to be one of Euripides' finest tragedies, for the construction of its plot, its use of language and its memorable characterisations of Phaedra and Hippolytus.

Furthermore, it asks serious and disturbing questions about the influence of divinity on human lives. Hippolytus tells her a story to explain how he ended up in the woods: Hippolytus says that his troubles started when his stepmother, Phaedra, tried to get him to sleep with her.

When he refused, she told Theseus, her husband, that Hippolytus had been sexually harassing her. Theseus believed her and banished Hippolytus from his kingdom. HIPPOLYTUS EURIPIDES TRANSLATED BY DAVID KOVACS Aphrodite Hippolytus Servant Chorus Nurse Phaedra Theseus Messenger Artemis Aphrodite enters above the skene.

APHRODITE [1] Mighty and of high renown, among mortals and in heaven alike, I am File Size: KB. Phaedra (Phèdre) “Phèdre” is a tragedy by the dramatic Jean Racine. It is based on ancient sources such as Seneca’s Phaedra and Euripides Hippolytus.

The famous work is about love with a woman as the main character. In HIPPOLYTUS, Phaedra is not presented in the most flattering of lights. She is presented as a lovesick and somewhat “lust sick” character that has an unnatural love for Hippolytus. This ultimately leads to her downfall but not until after she is presented as an unstable character that lacks the ability to control her own emotions.

Theramenes comes in with the harrowing tale of Hippolytus' death. Phaedra arrives and clears Hippolytus, then dies of the effects of a poison she has taken earlier. Grief-stricken, Theseus vows to make full amends to his son's memory and to treat Aricia as his daughter. It is too late.

Theramenes, Hippolytus' tutor, bursts in to tell Theseus that Hippolytus is dead. As they were leaving the gates of Troezen, Hippolytus driving in his chariot, a strange cry came from the sea, and Hippolytus' horses grew restive.

Then, in the sea, a great wave arose, from whose foam a monster, half-bull and half-snake, appeared. Seneca's Phaedra is actually remarkably similar to Euripides' Hippolytus, although he concludes his tragedy far more viciously, and with more obvious violence.

The chief difference between the two texts is Phaedra, who herself is spared by Seneca until after Hippolytus' death, thus allowing her revelation of his innocence to be all the more disheartening/5(34). The aim of this paper is to present the evolutionary course of Phaedra’s erotic passion for her stepson, Hippolytus, in Euripides’ homonymous tragedy.

Simultaneously, another point that will be discussed is the formation of passion by other dramatic persons, particularly the Nurse and Hippolytus. In "Phaedra" Racine returns to Greek mythology for his subject matter.

This classic story concerns its titular character who though married to Theseus falls in love with Hippolytus. "Phaedra" was incredibly well received with praise from the likes of Voltaire who described the /5(11).

Phaedra (FEE-drah) is a good deal younger than Theseus, and Hippolytus is now a young man, so they are not very different in age. Phaedra gives her slave a message for Hippolytus (from Pompeii) In the play, Hippolytus, Phaedra, and Theseus are all living together in Troizen, near Athens.

Euripides’ play Hippolytus was written in B. C., and ever since it has been regarded as one of the great classical works. In his treatment of the Phaedra myth, Euripides presents Phaedra in a state of mental anguish and exhaustion brought about by her love for Hippolytus, which she strives to conceal.

Phaedra has been the subject of many notable works in art, literature, music and film. In art. Phaedra with attendant, probably her nurse, a fresco from Pompeii circa 60–20 BC; Second century Roman Sarcophagus of Beatrice of Lorraine in the Camposanto in was the model for Nicola Pisano's work on the Pisa Baptistery in the mid-thirteenth century.

And, indeed, the story of Phaedra and Hippolytus provides an effective platform from which to espouse this view, incorporating as it does all manner of human passion, indulgence and excess. This intention is first reflected in Seneca’s title—choosing not the character name of Hippolytus since, as demonstrated in Euripides’ version, he is the relative straight arrow of the bunch.

It is important to note that this was not Euripides’ first play on the subject: a few years before it won him the first prize at the City Dionysia, Euripides had treated the myth of Hippolytus and Phaedra in yet another play, also titled Hippolytus.

The play, originally called "Phaedra and Hippolytus" (Fr. Phèdre et Hippolyte), is written in an Alexandrian verse. The premiere took place in "Phaedra" is considered the pinnacle of Racine. Download book Phaedra (by Jean Racine) epub, pdf, mobi, fb2.Written by Euripides, the play Hippolytus won a performance contest as part of a trilogy in Athens in BCE.

The play is part of a larger commentary and myth sequence based on Hippolytus, and many stories focusing on Phaedra herself.The rejected Phaedra then told Theseus, or wrote a letter, claiming that Hippolytus had raped her, or attempted to rape her.

Theseus then killed Hippolytus or cursed him, resulting in Poseidon sending a bull that scared the horses pulling Hippolytus’ chariot, resulting in Hippolytus’ death. Phaedra then committed suicide.